Books, Fandom

My Saturday at Book Con 2017

Book Con, the land of all things books and story-telling, came back to New York City on June 3rd and 4th. This was my second time at Book Con, as I first attended in 2015 and wanted to relive this amazing experience. I woke up Saturday morning, yelling “Merry Christmas” to my mom- the tickets were a Christmas present and my mom was my buddy for the convention- and I couldn’t wait to get to the Javits Center.

My mom and I arrived at the convention center around 8:30 AM In my ‘professional Book Con attendee’ opinion, unless you’re aiming for a ticket to a main stage panel or event, there’s no reason to show to the convention before 8 AM. It’s awesome to be one of the first to enter the show floor, however, not being one of the first in line or even in one of the first lines has ever affected my experience. At 10:00, people started heading up to level 3 of the Javits Center in a pretty orderly fashion, but the hecticness started as soon as I entered the show floor. My first stop was the Penguin-Random House booth for an exclusive Underlined tote bag and possibly getting into Stephanie Perkins’ autographing for an ARC of There’s Someone Inside Your House.IMG_4599.JPG

I received the Underlined tote bag, which I’m super happy about because the tote bag was the nicest quality bag I received over the weekend and was filled with goodies, such as an ARC of The Breathless and a beach towel that says “Don’t Get My Books Wet ”. I ended up not getting into Stephanie Perkin’s autographing line, as it was pretty long plus I was disappointed that she was only signing a partial ARC of There’s Someone Inside Your House.

After some walking around the showfloor and not being able to get into Adam Silvera’s signing at the Owlcrate booth (I was really hoping for an ARC of They Both Die at the End), I made my way to the RWA booth. There, I went to two autographings, the most exciting being for an ARC of McCall Hoyle’s The Thing with Feathers . The Thing with Feathers is one of my most anticipated releases of fall 2017, so it was awesome to be able to get the book and meet McCall herself. Afterwards, I met up with my mom, where we both attended giveaways at Penguin. We received copies of Phillip Pullman’s The Golden Compass, an ARC of Jared Reck’s The Short History of the Girl Next Door,  and a finished copy of The Serpent King by Jeff Zenter.

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My mom and I then took a break from the showfloor and had some lunch—you can never go wrong with chicken fingers and French fries- and we went over our plan for the day. As soon as we were done, I made my way to the Autographing Area for the Rainbow Rowell signing. This was my second time meeting Rainbow, as I went to her Carry On-inspired meet and greet at Book Con 2015. All of the authors I met at Book Con were super-nice, and Rainbow was no exception. We talked about how my day was going, and she signed my paperback copy of Carry On (bought because I had to for the signing, but also for its gorgeous cover design), my Barnes and Noble edition of Fangirl, and my B&N edition of Eleanor and Park. Right after Rainbow, I jumped right into Jenny Han’s autographing line. I was lucky enough to be one of the first twenty people in line so I received a cute Sixteen Candles-inspired card with Lara Jean on the front. Jenny signed my bind up of The Summer I Turned Pretty trilogy and my copies of To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before and Always and Forever, Lara Jean.

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After Jenny Han’s autographing, my mom and I did our best to try to get a ticket for Marie Lu’s signing of Warcross (aka one of the most, if not the most wanted ARC of Book Con). The signing was taking place at Penguin, and while Penguin had some amazing authors and volunteers this weekend, they were just not prepared for how many people wanted Warcross. Fans were swarming the booth before tickets were being handed out, and volunteers continued to warn that they would call security if people did not clear the area. I kid you not, as soon as tickets were finally being handed out, a line of people took up over half of the showfloor. Despite my efforts, I was unable to get a ticket for the signing. My mom and I went to Leigh Bardugo’s Grishaverse booth for  The Language of Thorns photo booth and buttons and then we called it a day, as we were completely ecstatic about the books we had received and the events we had both attended.

My Sunday at Book Con is soon to come! Now here’s a question for you: if there was one author you could meet and have sign your books, who would it be?? Let me know in the comments!

Book Reviews, Books

Review: The Names They Gave Us by Emery Lord

Summary: It’s the end of her junior year of high school, and Lucy’s life feels pretty good: she has the perfect boyfriend, Lukas, she’s captain of the swim team, her mother no longer has cancer, and she loves practicing her faith with her family, especially at their church summer camp. But everything comes crashing down when her mother’s cancer comes back. When her relationship with Lukas comes to a standstill and she becomes a summer counselor at the camp for troubled youth across the lake, Lucy questions how she’ll make it through each day, let alone the summer. Emery Lord’s The Names They Gave Us follows Lucy’s emotion-filled journey centered around faith, family, and friendship.

Cover Lust?: I want this cover displayed on my wall, please and thank you. I loved the painted look and how the tree is incorporated into the story.

 

My Rating: 5/5 stars

**WARNING: There are spoilers below for The Names They Gave Us**

My Thoughts:

 The Names They Gave Us had me hooked from the very first chapter. I just fell into Lucy’s story, the characters, and the setting. While the book does have a lot of happy moments, the story equally has its sad moments, as we see Marianne’s health deteriorate and Lucy struggle with her faith. She just doesn’t understand why her mother and her family had to be put in this situation. I appreciated the intimacy that Emery Lord sets up between the reader and Lucy, along with the intimacy between characters. Lucy has such a close relationship with her family, especially her mother, that my heart just broke for her.

My spirits definitely lifted up when Lucy goes to Daybreak, and I loved being surrounded by Lucy’s friends and campers. I loved how the novel primarily took place at Daybreak, adding to its summer contemporary vibes (the best contemporary books are ones that take place in the summer). My favorite part of the novel was Lucy having the summer that her mom wanted for her. She’s too busy to think about all the stress and grief in her life, and she finally makes her own inner circle of friends. I wish I could join on the trips to Tom’s with Anna, Keely, and Mohan in tow—plus the onion rings sounded soooo yummuy. Henry Jones is one of my new fictional boyfriends, and if I were a summer counselor, I would hope that Payton, Nadia, and Thuy would be among my campers.

Personally, my only issue with this book was the ending. When I got to the last page, I had to flip back and forth a few times to make sure that I hadn’t accidentally skipped a few pages. I wanted an ending where Lucy is staying goodbye to her campers, her friends, and Daybreak for the summer, NOT AN ENDING WHERE EVERYONE IS AT THE HOSPITAL AS LUCY’S MOM IS GOING INTO THE ICU. I get one of the points that Emery Lord makes- that no matter what happens to Marianne, Lucy will have her family, friends, and faith to support her and that there is always going to be some sort of unknown in life. It’s just that we built up to so much in this novel and we’re just left on our own to decide what happens—I’m sorry but I just need to know!! Between the story, the emotions, the twists, the charcters, I enjoyed The Names They Gave Us so much.Please Emery Lord, give us a sequel or novella!

Have you read The Names They Gave Us? Share your thoughts and feels in the comments!

Books, What I Read

What I Read in May

May was an absolutely fantastic reading month for me! Since I read 10 books this month, I kept my thoughts short and sweet, going from my least favorite read to my favorite read of the month.

Nemesis by Brendan Reichs // 2/5 Stars

Even though this is a YA novel and the main characters are teenagers, Nemesis felt more like a middle grade to me. While the premise was exciting and had some Lord of the Flies vibes, the plot and characters just didn’t deliver for me.

The Cabin by Natasha Preston // 2/5 Stars

My sister loves Natasha Preston’s books, so I typically read them alongside her. I was unfortunately very disappointed, as The Cabin’s premise was exciting, but the story itself didn’t have any sort of spark and was WAY too long– it took us forever to get to some sort of “solution”

A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab // 3.75/5 Stars

Unfortunately, I didn’t enjoy ADSOM as much as I thought I would, being head-over-heels for Schwab’s This Savage Song and Vicious. I thought that the plot was a bit predictable and unexciting at times, however, I plan on picking up the next book soon!

Windfall by Jennifer E. Smith // 4/5 Stars

While Windfall was over 400 pages long, it was a pretty quick read for me. I found it to be a little tropey and I didn’t completely enjoy the romance. I loved Leo and seeing Alice’s journey outside her relationship with Teddy. I teared up when she reflects on her parents’ lives with her uncle.

Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli // 4/5 Stars

I finally read Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda and really enjoyed it! There’s a dog and Oreos!! I have a full review here.

Geekerella by Ashley Poston // 4.5 Stars

Geekerella was the fandom+fairytale novel that I didn’t know I needed until I started reading. My full review can be found on Fangirl Fury here.

The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr // 4.75/5 Stars

The One Memory of Flora Banks took me by surprise, as it was one of my favorite reads of May. My review can be found here.

A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas // 4.5/5 Stars

One of my most anticipated reads of 2017 finally delivered this month. I have a full review of ACOWAR here, including a mini conflicted rant about there being more books in the ACOTAR world.

Radio Silence by Alice Oseman // 5/5 Stars

My only 5/5 Star read of the month, Radio Silence was the type of book that I just fell into. There’s Tumblr and Youtube and fanart and friendship and family and school all rolled into one perfect contemporary read.

The Names They Gave Us by Emery Lord // 5/5 Stars

From the moment I started The Names They Gave Us, I was hooked. Emery Lord’s latest release about family, friendship, religion, and grief was an emotion-filled story rolled into a summer contemporary. I have a full review here.

What did you read in May? Share in the comments below!

Book Tag, Top Five Wednesday

Top 5 Wednesday: Fandoms You Are No Longer In

Happy Wednesday! For today’s Top Five Wednesday, I’ll be discussing five fandoms that I am no longer part of. If you haven’t heard of Top Five Wednesday, it’s a collaborative group of book bloggers on Goodreads who use Wednesdays to discuss five things about a certain bookish or fandom category. I definitely recommend joining in on the fun—who knows, maybe you’ll find some new fandoms to replace your old ones!

Gossip Girl– I never had any interest in the Gossip Girl book series, but I watched the TV adaptation’s first three seasons back-to-back during my junior year of high school and was obsessed. Gossip Girl had just been recently added to Netflix, and it was all everyone could talk about. Yet by the fourth season, I had become bored. The only character I really cared about was Dan, and if I can recall correctly, even some of his choices were beginning to bother me. I then jumped right to the final episode, watched it, and haven’t looked back since.

November 9th by Colleen Hoover/ Colleen Hoover books– When I first read and finished November 9th by Colleen Hoover, I found it a bit problematic, but overall a pretty quick and good read. However, as I began seeing more reviews for the book, I reconsidered my opinion and found that November 9th had way too much male dominance for my liking. While I did pick up Hoover’s It Ends With Us, which I also found problematic at times,I don’t plan on reading another Colleen Hoover book anytime soon.

Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard– I read Red Queen soon after its release in 2015 and absolutely loved it. Yet, as I divulged more into the YA fantasy world, I found that the novel had similar plot devices and tropes to pre-existing fantasy reads. When Glass Sword came out a year later, I really didn’t have any interest in continuing the series.

The Study series by Maria V. Snyder– I read the first three books (Poison Study, Magic Study, and Fire Study) in 2016, and with each novel, I became more disenchanted with each story. I gave Poison Study  a 5 out of 5 stars, loving the novel for its unique plot and the way Maria V. Snyder handled the romance. While I enjoyed Magic Study for its character development, I really wasn’t in love with the new setting, and I remember speed-reading through Fire Study just to get to the ending. When I found out that this series expanded and continued, I debated back and forth on putting book #4 on my TBR, ultimately deciding not to.

Fuller House– Let me be clear: I am a huggeeeeee Full House fan—I don’t know if that statement fully describes my love for this TV show. I remember being so excited each time a new season came out on DVD, now the proud owner of all eight seasons, and I’m still waiting for the day that I get to San Francisco, “Everywhere You Look” playing in the background. That being said, you could imagine my excitement when my all-time favorite TV show (I’m always going back and forth between Full House and Parks and Recreation) was getting a ‘sequel’ on Netflix. I knew that Fuller House couldn’t be better than Full House, but I had hope. While I enjoyed season 1 for the most part, I just wanted more than ‘special appearances’ from Danny, Jesse, Becky, and Joey, and I couldn’t care less about DJ and Kimmy’s own kids. I was even more disappointed in season two, finding myself skipping through most of the episodes just to get to major plot points. I probably will watch and review season 3 out of the hope that I can rejoin this fandom.

What are some fandoms that you are no longer part of? Share in the comments below!

Book Reviews, Books

Review: The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr

 

Summary: Since she was ten years old, seventeen-year old Flora Banks has been unable to create new memories. Her mind often resets itself during the day, and she has no short-term memory whatsoever. Until she kisses her best friend’s boyfriend, Drake, and remembers it. Now faced with this one memory, Flora believes that Drake is not only responsible for restoring her memory, but for also making her feel like a normal teenage girl. With “be brave” written on her arm, Flora is determined to travel to Norway to find Drake and thank him for allowing her to reclaim her mind and her life.

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My Rating: 4.75/5 Stars

My Thoughts:

If you’re looking for a quick, yet meaningful read, look no further: I didn’t realize how addicted I would become to The One Memory of Flora Banks until I had read the first fifty pages within a half hour. You soon find yourself wanting to learn more about Flora, rooting for her along her journey in and out of Penzance, and feeling heartbroken for our main protagonist. The One Memory of Flora Banks was the first book I’ve read that’s told from the perspective of someone with amnesia. While some readers may not be drawn to Flora’s repetition, as she needs to constantly needs to remind herself of who she is, where she is, who she should know, etc., but I feel that it gave a more authentic portrait of her. This book has been compared to The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time , as The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time is told from the perspective of an individual who has a mental illness and has a more-so innocent mindset like Flora. Having read The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time also, I felt more drawn to Flora’s story because of its more unique plot and main POV.

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While The One Memory of Flora Banks has some frustrating parts (Paige’s ignorance, Flora’s very controlling parents), I loved this story and left me wanting the best for Flora. She is such an innocent individual who just needs the right support and community in her life. If there was one character I wish we had more involvement from, it would have been Jacob, Flora’s brother. He just cared for Flora so much, and he was one of the few people in Flora’s life that was completely honest with her. I also loved the community of people Flora finds in Svalbard—they make her feel like the normal person she wishes to be and how she should truly be treated. Without being too spoilery, the uncovering of the “truth” behind Flora’s life in the last section of the novel had me totally intrigued and wanting more.

Have you read The One Memory of Flora Banks? Share your thoughts and feels in the comments!

Books

Why I’m Obsessed with the Library (and You Should Be Too)

The library has always been a main staple in my life. Like myself, my mom is a huge reader and would always (and still does) take me to the library and let me pick out all the books that I wanted. One of the best days of my childhood was when I was old enough to take out my own library card. Since then, I go to my local library at least two times a week, and I am the queen of the YA section. I encourage you, my fellow reader, to use your local library for the following reasons!

You save money- Listen, I am all about buying and collecting books. However, if I bought all the books I read each month, I’d probably be spending $70-$100 a month that I don’t have. I’m a broke college student after all! I buy about 25% of the books that I read, with the rest coming from the library.

You’re always encouraged to read- My library allows me to take out more books that I could possibly read within two weeks. Even if I can’t finish a book before the return date, I can almost always go online and renew it for another two weeks. Also, even if your local library doesn’t have a book that you’re looking for, most branches can get the book from another library in their system in a quick amount of time. It’s another fun form of book mail!

You feel better about not finishing books I’m all about reading books that I genuinely enjoy. If you follow me on Goodreads , you’ll rarely see me give a 1-2 star reading. When I am not enjoying a book, I almost immediately put it down and don’t rate or review it. I really don’t feel guilty about DNF’ing a library book because I didn’t pay for it. If I bought a book that I DNF’ed, I would just think about the money I wasted on the book.

Saves shelf space- Let’s be honest, even though I am a frequent library user, I still buy a lot of books. While I would love to own every book that I read, my bookshelves and storage space certainly would not feel the same way. I just don’t have enough space (still wishes for that Beauty and the Beast size library). By using the library, I can read all the books I want without having to reorganize my shelves a thousand times.

You support your local community- Libraries are one of the main community centers in most towns and cities. My library has a variety of services, and they offer a lot of events, from author meet-and-greets to story-time hours for younger children.

Do you use the library or do you buy all of your books? Do you do both? Share in the comments below!

Book Tag, Top Five Wednesday

Top 5 Wednesday: Favorite Minor Characters

Happy Wednesday! I’ve recently decided to participate in Top 5 Wednesday. If you haven’t heard of Top 5 Wednesday, it’s a huge collaborative group of book bloggers from any platform who post list of their top 5 favorite things every Wednesday. The category for each week changes, and for this week it’s favorite minor characters. My top five minor characters are from a mix of different mediums.

Dol from Vicious by V.E. Schwab – Dol is the perfect sidekick because HE’S A DOG AND HOW COULD YOU NOT WANT A DOG AS YOUR SIDEKICK? Sydney and Dol just make the best team in one of the best books ever- sorry, but I will not stop screaming my love for Vicious from the rooftops.

Alis from the A Court of Thorns and Roses series by Sarah J. Maas – Alis is one of the best components of the Spring Court. She has a quick wit and was one of the few members that actually helped Feyre in the long run.

Samuel Seabury from Hamilton– “Farmers Refuted” is one of my favorite songs (frankly, I love every song from the show) in the first act of Hamilton. I love how Samuel Seabury goes back and forth with Hamilton throughout the tune, and seeing his character come to life when I saw the show made the song even better.

Tigris from Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins– I loved seeing Tigris come to life in Mockingjay: Part 2, and I really enjoy learning about her part in the resistance. Having a The Hunger Games movie or reread marathon is a must for me this summer!

Jean Ralphio from Parks and Recreation – I’ve been re-watching Parks and Recreation a lot lately (when am I not is the true question), and my love for Jean Ralphio has only grown. I love his interaction with Ron the most, as Jean Ralphio’s humor and Ron’s bluntness makes for some funny scenes. It’s weird to think that the creators of Parks and Recreation considered making Jean Ralphio a love interest for Leslie!

Who are some of your favorite minor characters? Share in the comments below!

Book Reviews, Books

Review: Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

Summary: Sixteen-year old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier enjoys participating in the school musical and emailing with Blue, the pen name of another not-so-openly gay guy at Simon’s school. But when class clown Martin comes across Simon’s emails, Martin blackmails Simon into helping him date one of their friends. If Simon doesn’t play wingman, Martin will reveal Simon’s sexual identity and his emails with Blue. Filled with humor, love, and suspense, Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda follows Simon and his friends’ suddenly complicated junior year.

My Rating: 4/5 stars

My Thoughts: **Warning: there are spoilers for Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda below**

 I admit, it took me a while to pick up Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda because I was a bit scared by all the hype surrounding the book. I wasn’t totally sold by the premise of the novel, and I didn’t want to be the one person not to like this book. However, I’ve been really interested in Becky Albertalli’s latest release The Upside of Unrequited, and while you don’t need to read Simon to read Upside, there’s apparently a Simon reference in the newer release. Despite my fear of not liking Simon, I ended up really enjoying the book and read it within two days!

I loved how Martin’s blackmailing started on the very first page of the book because we jumped right into the plot. We didn’t need the first two chapters or so just to set up Simon’s life, rather we learned about our main character as he faced his dilemma. I figured that it would have been too predictable to have Martin be Blue, and as much as I loved the idea of Cal and Simon together, it just would have been too convenient. I actually predicted Bram as Blue about halfway into the novel, after Simon learned that Blue was Jewish (Abraham is a traditionally Jewish name).

I also enjoyed reading about Simon’s family and friends. I loved how close Simon’s family is, and it makes me sad that Simon was nervous about coming out to them, as they were totally supportive of him no matter what. I loved his friendship with Nick and Leah because they were all just so comfortable with one another, playing videogames with Bieber in Nick’s basement. One of my few ‘disappointments’ about the novel was the lack of Oreos! Whenever people talk about Becky Albertalli or her books, Oreos almost always become a topic of conversation. Yes, Oreos were in the novel (and on the cover), but there just wasn’t an abundance. I wanted Blue/Bram to show up with a bouquet full of Oreos for Simon, but in the end, I wouldn’t expect Nabisco to become the sponsor of the novel.

I’m looking forward to the Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda film adaption (even though I’m sad that it’s not coming out until 2018), and Becky Albertalli’s next release, also slated for 2018, will be told from the perspective of Leah and will be the sequel to Simon. I’m really excited for this book as well because Leah was one of my favorite characters in Simon and I wish we had more interaction with her.

Have you read Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda? Share your thoughts in the comments!

Movie Reviews, TV & Film

Everything, Everything Movie Review

The film adaptation of Nicola Yoon’s Everything, Everything was released in the United States on May 19th, and I was lucky enough to see the movie during its opening weekend! The film and book follows eighteen-year old Madeline, who has an illness that prevents her from ever going outside. Madeline is somewhat content on spending life indoors, until Olly moves in next door. She’s forced to question how she can spend a life inside when there’s a person and a whole world waiting for her. Madeline is played by Amandla Stenberg, with Nick Robinson playing Olly.

**Warning: This review will contain spoilers for the film and book, Everything, Everything.

My Thoughts:

Amandla Stenberg was the perfect Madeline. She was exactly how I pictured Madeline when I read Everything, Everything. I loved seeing all of her books scattered around her bedroom and office, and it was so fun to see her work on her book blog. I also enjoyed seeing her growing addiction to Modcloth, it just made her feel so much more real.

I absolutely loved Nick Robinson as Olly! I think he fit the role perfectly, and I’m so excited to see Nick in future roles. His looks definitely don’t hurt him either! I saw Everything, Everything with my sister, who I read the book alongside with back in 2015, and she swears that Nick is a mix of Ansel Elgort and Shawn Mendes!. One of my favorite parts of the movie was toward the beginning, when Olly takes his mom’s Bundt cakes and keeps placing it on the windowsill for Madeline. My favorite edition of the cake was when Olly made a fake IV for it. It was so funny to get a sense of Olly humor and his desire to get to know Madeline.

My main critique of the film is that I feel that we needed a bit more interaction with Olly and Madeline. I definitely felt their love for each other, but I just wanted more. I would have loved to see more of the artwork from the book incorporated into the actual film. However, I loved how the film set up Madeline and Olly’s text messaging. Instead of having scenes filled with phone screenshots or messages, their messages were played out as them talking in one of Madeline’s architecture models. Additionally, I noticed few differences between the book and the film, which I’m so happy about. I feel that the film captured the true heart and spirit of Everything, Everything so well! I read the book back in November 2015, so while I may have forgotten a few things, the only difference I found between the book and the film was that Olly and Madeline didn’t go to Carla’s house before going to the airport.

While I do prefer the book to the movie, I appreciated how the movie took more time with the ending. One of my critiques of the book was that the ending felt very rushed. Yet, in the film, there was still about twenty-five minutes left of the movie after Madeline returns from Hawaii, allowing her to learn more about her condition and to confront her problems with her mom and Olly.

My Overall Rating: 4.5/5 Stars

I really enjoyed the film, and I definitely recommend seeing it if you have or haven’t read Everything, Everything. I’m really excited to see Nick Robinson star as Simon Spier in the film adaptation of Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda, and Amandla Stenberg is currently working on The Darkest Minds film adaptation and she’s set to play Starr in the film adaptation of The Hate U Give.

Have you seen or read Everything, Everything? Share your thoughts & feels in the comments below!

Book Tag, Books

A To Z Bookish Survey

 

 

Hello! During stressful times (aka the school year), I try to relax by catching up on reading blog posts and watching Booktube videos. Recently, Kristin of SuperSpaceChick posted the A To Z Bookish Survey tag on her Booktube channel and I loved it so much. The tag was originally created by The Perpetual Page-Turner and I’m so happy that she created this post, it’s so much fun!

Author you’ve read the most books from: Barbara Parks. The Junie B. Jones books were a key part of my childhood.

Best Sequel Ever: Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo

Currently Reading: A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab

Drink of Choice While Reading: Green tea, preferably accompanied by summer and my backyard

E-reader or Physical Book? Physical book. I just can’t concentrate while reading on an e-reader, I like the feeling of holding a physical book so much more.

Fictional Charcter You Probably Would Have Dated in High School: Neville Longbottom. I think Neville is such a sweetheart, and I love the person he becomes in the last 3 books. Also, the Deathly Hallows movie Neville makes me swoon .

Glad You Gave This Book A Chance: Six of Crows b y Leigh Bardugo. Don’t be scared by the fact that you haven’t read the Grisha trilogy beforehand, like I was. You can totally read this series without ever picking up Shadow and Bone .

Hidden Gem Book: Billy and Me by Giovanna Fletcher. I wish more of her books were available in the US.

Important Moment in your Reading Life: Discovering Booktube. I found Booktube when I was a junior in high school and I had just made reading one of my top priorities again. Booktube has inspired me to pick up so many books and to start Fangirl Fury.

Just Finished: Radio Silence by Alice Oseman

Kinds of Books You Won’t Read: I’m not a huge fan of books with supernatural elements.

Longest Book You’ve Read: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling

Major book hangover because of: This Savage Song by Victoria Schwab. I still can’t take my mind of that book

Number of Bookcases You Own: 3

One Book You Have Read Multiple Times: Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Preferred Place To Read: My bedroom

Quote that inspires you/gives you all the feels from a book you’ve read:


“ “I didn’t know someone could love me like this.” she said. “ Could love me and love me and love me without… needing space.” Lincoln wasn’t asleep. He rolled on top of her.

“There’s no air in space,” he said.”- Attachments by Rainbow Rowell. I wouldn’t call myself a huge romantic, but this is the one of many Rainbow Rowell quotes that give me all the feels.

Reading Regret:I think it’s more of a disappointment than a regret, but not having any interest in Cassandra Clare’s Shadowhunter books. I tried reading City of Bones in 2015, but I just couldn’t get into it and I really don’t have any interest in the world or premise.

Series You Started And Need To Finish (all books are out in the series): To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han.

Three of your All-Time Favorite Books: Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell, 13 Little Blue Envelopes by Maureen Johnson, and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling

Unapologetic Fangirl For: The Fault in Our Stars by John Green 

Very Excited For This Release More Than All The Others: Tower of Dawn (Throne of Glass #6) by Sarah J. Maas. Chaol is my favorite character in the TOG series and I’m so excited for this book because it’s centered around him.

Worst Bookish Habit: Eating while reading because I’m not very talented at not getting food in my books.

X Marks The Spot- Start at the top left of your shelf and pick the 27th book: Attachments by Rainbow Rowell 

Your latest book purchase: A Psalm for Lost Girls by Katie Bayerl.

ZZZ-snatcher book (last book that keeps you up WAY late): Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo, where my post-read feels insisted on keeping me up even later.

Have you done the A to Z Bookish Survey? Let me know in the comments below!